Psoriasis Blog

Subscribe to the RSS feed of this blog!

Psoriasis and Type 2 Diabetes

PSORIASIS AND TYPE 2 DIABETES
As a diabetic (Type 2) I was interested to find if there was any link with psoriasis, and it turns out there is.
A study was done at Rabin Medical Centre, Israel which included 46,000 patients - a large number - and the proportion of diabetics (age adjusted) with psoriasis was significantly higher than in the control group.
This does not claim to be definitive proof of a link, more studies need to be done, but on the face of it an association between diabetes and psoriasis was shown to apparently exist.
Another study published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology (JEADV) showed similar outcomes.
The proportion of psoriasis diabetic sufferers over the age of 35 years was significantly higher than in the control group.
The conclusion drawn was that there is an association between diabetes and psoriasis and that such dual problem sufferers should be aware that smoking, high blood cholesterol and hypertension are part of the problem.
It seems reasonable that controlling these factors would be advantageous in the control of both diabetes and psoriasis in such people.
It was reported in October 2012 that a study at the University of California, Davis, showed that a patient with psoriasis had almost four times the likelihood of developing diabetes Type 2 than those without psoriasis.
The lesson would appear to be that as you get older as a psoriasis sufferer you should be aware of your lifestyle and control your diet, exercise etc to reduce the chance of the onset of diabetes.

As a diabetic (Type 2) I was interested to find if there was any link with psoriasis, and it turns out there is. 

A study was done at Rabin Medical Centre, Israel which included 46,000 patients - a large number - and the proportion of diabetics (age adjusted) with psoriasis was significantly higher than in the control group.  This does not claim to be definitive proof of a link, more studies need to be done, but on the face of it an association between diabetes and psoriasis was shown to apparently exist.

Read more: Psoriasis and Type 2 Diabetes

   

Posriasis and Alcohol

As we’re about to enter the annual ‘party season’ in the lead up to Christmas, I thought it might be a good idea to talk about psoriasis and alcohol, and the affect drink can have on the condition.
Studies have shown that there is a link between the consumption of alcohol and a flare up in psoriasis – even more so if the consumption involves binge drinking.  One study indicates that psoriasis is present in only 1% of the population who don’t drink, compared to 5% of those who do, whilst chronic alcoholics have been shown to suffer from psoriasis at a rate of up to 7 times more than the population as a whole.  In addition, around half of adults with the condition also displayed levels of alcoholism or alcohol abuse.  These are quite big statistics.
Whilst alcohol can enflame your condition, at the same time it can have a severely negative effect on the success of your treatment, inhibiting drugs and reducing the effectiveness of creams and topical applications to your skin. This becomes even more exacerbated with sustained alcohol abuse over the long term.
Much work still needs to be done on studying exactly how alcohol interacts with psoriasis, although it is believed that it may contribute to growth of the yeast ‘Candida’ within the digestive system -  another condition linked with psoriasis.  Studies indicate there may also be a link between psoriasis and smoking, which affects the immune system as well as the skin, contributing to psoriasis outbreaks. Yet another good reason to stop smoking.
However, this does not mean that if you have psoriasis and drink heavily then you will necessarily continue to suffer.  Evidence shows that those who stop drinking completely, or drink only moderately and infrequently, see a marked decrease in the frequency of their outbreaks.  And when outbreaks do occur, they are likely to be far less virulent.
So, this coming Christmas season, do enjoy yourself, but try to remember – everything in moderation.  Your psoriasis should then be kept under control come the New Year, and your overall health will also benefit.

As we’re about to enter the annual ‘party season’ in the lead up to Christmas, I thought it might be a good idea to talk about psoriasis and alcohol, and the affect drink can have on the condition.

Studies have shown that there is a link between the consumption of alcohol and a flare up in psoriasis – even more so if the consumption involves binge drinking.  One study indicates that psoriasis is present in only 1% of the population who don’t drink, compared to 5% of those who do, whilst chronic alcoholics have been shown to suffer from psoriasis at a rate of up to 7 times more than the population as a whole.  In addition, around half of adults with the condition also displayed levels of alcoholism or alcohol abuse.  These are pretty big statistics.

Read more: Posriasis and Alcohol

   

Psoriasis and Diet

Many academic and medical studies have been carried out on the effect of diet on psoriasis, and there is also a lot of anecdotal information out there from people who suffer with the condition of what psoriasis treatments work, and what actually has an adverse affect on them.
Unfortunately, there is no definitive list of exactly what foods are ‘good’ and which are ‘bad’ – although research continues into what is beneficial and more ‘likely’ to help you, or otherwise.
So here is my quick list of foods which may have an effect on your psoriasis. Unfortunately, as it seems is true of most treatments related to psoriasis, what works for one person or affects them may not work for another:
‘Good’ Food
A healthy diet and regular exercise is recommended. Obviously, this is always advisable, but psoriasis sufferers are more susceptible to heart and vascular disease, so it is a good idea to keep fit and healthy and keep the weight off.
Fruit
Vegetables, particularly those ric in carotenoids including:
mangoes, sweetcorn, sweet potatoes, carrots, leafy greens and possibly tomatoes (see below for foods to avoid)
Whole grains
Low-fat dairy products (Also see below for foods to avoid)
Lean meats and fish
Fish oil supplements
Plenty of water
Foods to Avoid
Certain foods can exacerbate your psoriasis, but it can and does vary from person to person.  Our best advice is for you to try eliminating them from your diet, one at a time, to see whether you notice any improvement.
Alcohol – best to avoid completely
Junk food – high in saturated fat, trans fats, refined sugars and starches
Red meat, processed meats such as sausages, bacon or ham
Vegetables containing solanine including:
aubergine, pepper, white potatoes, tomatoes
Citrus fruits and citrus based products, eg fruit juice and lemonade
Gluten
wheat, barley, rye

Many academic and medical studies have been carried out on the effect of diet on psoriasis, and there is also a lot of anecdotal information out there from people who suffer with the condition of what psoriasis treatments work, and what actually has an adverse affect on them.

Unfortunately, there is no definitive list of exactly what foods are ‘good’ and which are ‘bad’ – although research continues into what is beneficial and more ‘likely’ to help you, or otherwise.

So here is my quick list of foods which may be having an affect on your psoriasis. Unfortunately, as it seems is true of most treatments related to psoriasis, what works for one person or affects them may not work for another:

Read more: Psoriasis and Diet

   

Guttate Psoriasis Tip - Sunbathing Helps!

Dear Katharine,

First off – I want to thank you for your psoriasis shampoo & conditioner. They’ve done an amazing job on my scalp psoriasis, and your gel has really helped with the psoriasis I get on my arms. I can’t thank you enough.

But back to my ‘tip’ for another way to help treat guttate psoriasis naturally...Sunbathing!

 

Read more: Guttate Psoriasis Tip - Sunbathing Helps!

   

Page 4 of 5

 Seperator
 Seperator

Testimonials

"Dear Katharine,

Your face cream is amazing!!

Best wishes

Stella"

 

Pregnant Safe

All Katharine Botanicals Psoriasis products are perfectly safe for use by pregnant women

Recent Blog Posts...

  • World Psoriasis Day: Take Part with a Testimonial

    Follow my blog with Bloglovin

    World Psoriasis Day takes place on the 29th of October each year and serves as a podium for people to experience psoriasis to offer their accounts of living with the condition. Though one of the first skin diseases to be recognised psoriasis continues to be misunderstood and those that experience it discover large amounts of misinformation available. World Psoriasis Day is attempting to combat this confusion by encouraging those who experience psoriasis to post pictures of themselves with testimonials.

    Read more... Link  
  • Hug a Vegan This September

    Many consider a vegan lifestyle to be very rewarding and it's certainly easier on our environment. Whether you're aiming to eat nothing that comes from an animal or ensure that you're not using products that use animal products or participate in animal testing, these are all elements that reduce cruelty and pollution. Recent studies have shown that methane from livestock accounts for more greenhouse gasses in the UK than our roads and trains combined! And animal testing accounts for thousands of animals that are forced to endure discomfort for human cosmetic needs. This is why Katharine Botanicals offers a wide range of products that are entirely vegan.

    As the internet makes it easier for conscientious shoppers to make ethical choices, it's also easier than ever to discover the benefits of making these choices when you purchase. In fact, PETA recently held a celebration just for vegans called "hug a vegan day". Last year it was all about vegetarians and now vegans are getting the love from PETA! The official hug a vegan day was held last Friday on the 27th of September but we feel that there is all the time in the world to show your appreciation for all the good things nature has to offer.

    Read more... Link  
  • Ethically Aware Consumers Demand More From Their Cosmetics

    A recent report from The Soil Association shows that a more ethically aware group of shoppers are taking their business online to ensure that they're purchasing products with the transparency they crave. This is both regarding organic food and other products, including cosmetics.

    In fact, the organic cosmetic industry grew by 5.6% last year and now stands at a value of £31.8m.

    Read more... Link  
  • Sunlight and Benefits to Psoraisis

    Whilst the recent weather has been somewhat unpredictable, we can also say that this has been one of the brightest summers that the UK has enjoyed for some time. This is an excellent opportunity for suffers of psoriasis to enjoy sunlight and the vitamin D that comes with it. Vitamin D and ultra violet light are both completely natural elements that can help to soothe skin suffering from psoriasis. Ultra violet light is already used as a medical treatment by many doctors, where synthesised UVB rays are created with sun lamps. Injections are also utilised to encourage the skin to soak up even more of the beneficial UV light but I’m sure most would rather a natural course of sunbathing. This bright sunshine gives many who live with psoriasis the chance to enjoy a free and completely natural course of UV light and all the benefits that come with it.

    Read more... Link